EGNOS and Galileo: Navigation Solutions Powered by Europe

Published: 
07 August 2014

European citizens from all walks of life will rely on Galileo and EGNOS. To demonstrate how, the GSA has launched a new video giving viewers an inside look at the many ways European satellite navigation is bettering their day-to-day lives.

Question: What do the following have in common?
•    A farmer driving a tractor
•    The captain of a large cargo ship manoeuvring in port
•    An environmental expert surveying a forest
•    A truck driver transporting hazardous good
•    A banker trading commodities

Answer: They all rely on satellite navigation.

Satellite navigation goes far beyond guiding you from point A to point B. To show you the extent of satellite navigation’s impact, the EU GNSS Agency (GSA) has launched a new video. The video gives viewers an inside look at the many benefits both EGNOS today and Galileo in the future are bringing to European citizens.

              Watch This: EGNOS & Galileo – Navigation Powered by Europe

Europe contributes to making positioning more accurate, reliable and available through its two, state-of-the-art satellite navigation programmes: EGNOS and Galileo. EGNOS is Europe’s first concrete venture into satellite navigation. Using geo-stationary satellites and a network of ground stations, it increases the accuracy of existing satellite signals, along with providing a unique integrity message.

Galileo, on the other hand, is Europe’s independent global satellite navigation system. Once fully-operational, it will provide reliable, highly-accurate global positioning under civilian control.


From aviation to mapping, rail to maritime and everything in between, EU GNSS programmes are changing the way we live and do business. European citizens from many walks of life will rely on Galileo and EGNOS to power services that enhance efficiency, safety, productivity and economic growth.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

More information:

The European GNSS Agency

Updated: Mar 25, 2016